Presented by The Kennedy Forum Scattergood Foundation

Menu Close

Below is the relevant legislation related to parity that has been introduced during the current or recently adjourned legislative session. State parity legislation passed in any state since 2008 is usually designed to increase compliance with the federal law and to strengthen state laws.

Are we missing any passed or introduced legislation? Let us know at info@paritytrack.org.

Introduced Legislation

Regular Session: Convened 1/22/2019
Will adjourn: 6/30/2019
Governor’s deadline: 8/9/2019

2015

HB 2825
Introduced: 2/2015
Sponsor: Rep. Keny-Guyer and Sen. Steiner Hayward
Status: Dead 7/2015
Summary: This bill tried to allow the Oregon Health Authority to seek and receive money from the state’s general fund to pay for crisis intervention services and residential care for people with behavioral health conditions.

HB 3427
Introduced: 2/2015
Sponsor: Rep. Gallegos
Status: Dead 7/2015
Summary: This bill attempted to create a Task Force on Mental Health Care Reimbursement. The Task Force would have been required to study and make recommendations to ensure that compensation for mental health practitioners adheres to federal and state mental health parity requirements.

HB 3358
Introduced: 2/2015
Sponsor: Rep. Lively
Status: Dead 7/2015
Summary: This bill attempted to insert a section into the state insurance law that prohibited insurers from discriminating in determining reimbursement rate for any provider. The bill specifically mentions that this discrimination is prohibited in the determination of rate reimbursement for clinical social workers, nurse practitioners, psychologists, professional

SB 661
Introduced: 2/2015
Sponsor: Health Care and Veterans’ Affairs
Status: Dead 7/2015
Summary: This bill intended to eliminate health plans from requiring cost-sharing for opioid analgesic drug products (buprenorphine or methadone) that exceeded the lowest cost-sharing for any other prescription drug covered by the plan. This bill only applied to plans that offered opioid analgesic drug products.

HB 2421
Introduced: 1/2015
Sponsor: Requested by Governor Kitzhaber for Oregon Health Authority
Status: Dead 7/2015
Summary: This bill tried to forbid coordinated care organizations that provide Medicaid coverage from using prior authorization for mental health drugs.

SB 831
Introduced: 3/2015
Sponsor: Sen. Monnes Anderson, Sen. Winters, and Sen. Bates
Status: Dead 7/2015
Summary: This bill tried to require coordinated care organizations that provide Medicaid coverage to contract with clinical mental health professionals to provide mental health services to people enrolled in the Oregon state health plan.

2014

SB 1523
Introduced: 2/2014
Sponsor: Requested by Senate Interim Committee on General Government, Consumer and Small Business Protection
Status: Dead 3/2014
Summary: This bill tried to change sections of the state insurance law about autism coverage and parity. It would apply the section of the law about autism coverage to self-insured state employee plans, self-insured plans for public school teachers, and self-insured plans for Oregon Health and Science University.
The bill would have changed the parity section of the insurance law so that it applied to public employee plans, including the self-insured plans listed above.

2013

HB 2353
Introduced: 1/2013
Sponsor: Rep. Kennemer
Status: Dead 7/2013
Summary: This bill tried to change the state insurance law so that insurers would have to include in their annual reports to the Director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services information about how they determine their reimbursement rates for licensed clinical social workers. The bill also would have directed the House Interim Committee on Health Care to study how insurers determine their usual, customary, and reasonable charges and decide if they are violating the parity section of the state insurance law.

HB 2354
Introduced: 1/2013
Sponsor: Rep. Kennemer
Status: Dead 7/2013
Summary: This bill tried to change the parity section of the state insurance law so that reimbursement for particular behavioral health services would be the same regardless of which kind of provider performed them.

HB 3332
Introduced: 2/2013
Sponsor: Rep. Nathanson and Rep. Tomei
Status: Dead 7/2013
Summary: This bill tried to allow the Oregon Health Authority to seek and receive money from the state’s general fund to pay for crisis intervention services and residential care for people with behavioral health conditions.

HB 2897
Introduced: 2/2013
Sponsor: Rep. Buckley and Sen. Edwards
Status: Dead 7/2013
Summary: This bill tried to create a new section of the state insurance law about autism coverage. Here is how this bill would have been different than what is currently in the section of state law about autism coverage:

  • Contains no age-specific requirements
  • No specific requirements for weekly hours of applied behavior analysis
  • Defines autism spectrum disorder as Asperger’s disorder, autistic disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified
  • Defines treatment of autism as behavioral health treatment, pharmacy care, psychiatric care, psychological care, rehabilitative care, augmentative communication devices, medical accommodations for usual care, coordination of care, and any other services that are medically necessary
  • Lists extensive requirements for autism line therapists
  • Does not restrict plans to reviewing a child’s treatment plan to only once every 6 months

2012

HB 4127
Introduced: 2/2012
Sponsor: Rep. Hoyle and Rep. Weidner
Status: Dead 3/2012
Summary: This bill tried to change the parity section of the state insurance law so that the Oregon Health Authority would be required to create a certification process for providers of behavioral health services that are not otherwise under the licensing authority of the Oregon Health Authority.

SB 1568
Introduced: 2/2012
Sponsor: Sen. Hass and Sen. Bates
Status: Dead 3/2012
Summary: This bill tried to create a new section of the state insurance law about autism coverage. Here is how this bill would have been different than what is currently in the section of state law about autism coverage:

  • Contains no age-specific requirements
  • No specific requirements for weekly hours of applied behavior analysis
  • Defines autism spectrum disorder as Asperger’s disorder, autistic disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified
  • Defines treatment of autism as behavioral health treatment, pharmacy care, psychiatric care, psychological care, rehabilitative care, augmentative communication devices, medical accommodations for usual care, coordination of care, and any other services that are medically necessary
  • Lists extensive requirements for autism line therapists
  • Does not restrict plans to reviewing a child’s treatment plan to only once every 6 months

2011

HB 2398
Introduced: 1/2011
Sponsor: Requested by House Interim Committee on Health Care
Status: Dead 6/2011
Summary: This bill tried to change the state medical assistance (Medicaid) law so that the Oregon Health Authority would no longer be allowed to contract with separate managed care organizations for physical health services and mental health services (eliminates carve-out arrangements).

SB 3164
Introduced: 2/2011
Sponsor: Rep. Buckley
Status: Dead 6/2011
Summary: This bill tried to change the state insurance law so that insurance plans must reimburse services provided by a marriage and family therapist or counselor that does not have a license but is authorized by the state to provide those services.

HB 3028
Introduced: 2/2011
Sponsor: Rep. Kennemer
Status: Dead 2/2011
Summary: This bill attempted to insert a section into the state insurance law that prohibited insurers from discriminating in determining reimbursement rates for any provider. The bill specifically mentions that this discrimination is prohibited in the determination of rate reimbursement for clinical social workers, nurse practitioners, psychologists, professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists. This bill is similar to HB 3358 introduced in 2016.

HB 2324
Introduced: 1/2011
Sponsor: Rep. Barnhart and Rep. Greenlick
Status: Dead 6/2011
Summary: This bill tried to change the parity section of the state insurance law so that insurance plans would no longer be exempt from covering court-ordered services that are the result of a conviction for driving while intoxicated.

SB 555
Introduced: 1/2011
Sponsor: Sen. Edwards and Rep. Buckley
Status: Dead 6/2011
Summary: This bill tried to create a new section of the state insurance law about autism coverage. Here is how this bill would have been different than what is currently in the section of state law about autism coverage:

  • Contains no age-specific requirements
  • Requires 87 hours per month for applied behavior analysis
  • Defines autism spectrum disorder as Asperger’s disorder, autistic disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified
  • Defines treatment of autism as habilitative or rehabilitative care, pharmacy care, psychiatric care, psychological care, therapeutic care augmentative communication devices, medical accommodations for usual care, coordination of care, and any other services that are medically necessary
  • Allows public employee plans to have a separate $500 deductible for autism coverage, use 20% coinsurance rate for autism services, and have no limits for out-of-pocket expenses

HB 2214
Introduced: 1/2011
Sponsor: Rep. Buckley, Rep. Thompson, and Sen. Edwards
Summary: This bill tried to change the section of the state insurance law about coverage for pervasive developmental disorder, specifically about autism coverage. Here is how this bill would have been different than what is currently in the separate section of state law about autism coverage:

  • Contains no age-specific requirements
  • Contains no specific treatment hour requirements for applied behavior analysis
  • Defines autism spectrum disorder as Asperger’s disorder, autistic disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified
  • Defines treatment of autism as habilitative or rehabilitative care, pharmacy care, psychiatric care, psychological care, therapeutic care augmentative communication devices, coordination of care, and any other services that are medically necessary
  • Only allows insurance plans to review a child’s treatment plan once every 12 months

2010

HB 3607
Introduced: 2/2010
Sponsor: Rep. Kennemer
Status: Dead 2/2010
Summary: This bill tried to change the state insurance law so that insurers would have to include in their annual reports to the Director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services information about how they determine their reimbursement rates for licensed clinical social workers. The bill also would have directed the House Interim Committee on Health Care to study how insurers determine their usual, customary, and reasonable charges and decide if they are violating the parity section of the state insurance law.

2009

HB 3000
Introduced: 3/2009
Sponsor: Rep. Buckley, Rep. Greenlick, and Rep. Edwards
Status: Dead 6/2009
Summary: This bill tried to change the section of the state insurance law about coverage for pervasive developmental disorder, specifically about autism coverage. Here is how this bill would have been different than what is currently in the separate section of state law about autism coverage:

  • Requires plans to cover autism services for individuals under 21
  • Sets annual maximum of $36,000 instead of 25 hour per week limit
  • Defines autism spectrum disorder as Asperger’s disorder, autistic disorder, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, and any of the pervasive developmental disorders in the DSM
  • Defines treatment of autism as applied behavior analysis, prescription drugs, blood level tests, psychiatric care, psychological care, speech therapy, physical therapy, and occupational therapy
  • No language about how often an insurance plan can review a child’s treatment plan
  • Applies to Medicaid plans

Get Support

Oregon Insurance Division

Common Violations

In seeking care or services, be aware of the common ways parity rights can be violated.

Common Violations

Definition

Term Name


View in Glossary